Getting Started with LinkedIn – for Writers

Getting Started with LinkedIn – for Writers.

LinkedIn is a powerful marketing and networking tool that offers a lot of opportunities for writers.

Whether you’re just starting your own business, or you’re a multi-published author; whether you write fiction or non-fiction; whether you write long or short, LinkedIn can help you find jobs, connections, and resources to improve your craft in your chosen specialty.

This post is a quick snapshot on getting started with LinkedIn if you are a writer. The tool is user friendly and quite a great resource for finding companies you want to work with or for.

Getting started:

Create an account. You can use LinkedIn a lot for free (it’s the version I have), so don’t feel like you need to invest money. You can, of course, but it’s not required to start out.

Create a profile. LinkedIn walks you through the profile creation process step by step. Help is available all along the way, too.  Use it; it’s actually helpful! Creating a profile is the most time-consuming part of getting started, but it’s definitely worth it to pay attention to each section.

  • For your current job title, avoid generic terms such as president, owner, wordsmith or crafty titles such as ‘word whisperer’, ‘writing goddess’, ‘chief bottle washer’. Think about how companies you want to work for will search for someone with your skill set. Keep it simple, straightforward, and relevant.
  • When you add in current and past employment, do the same with the titles (as prior bullet). Sure, you may have been ‘senior manager’, but that doesn’t benefit you when someone is seeking a software writer. You can include ‘senior manager’ in the description of the job, but put key works in your job titles, as well as in descriptions of job responsibilities.

Search for jobs, groups, people. The search bar at the top of the screen offers numerous search methods, and you can take advantage of the Advanced feature to help narrow in on the jobs, groups, and people you are seeking. Search on such terms as ‘beginner writer’, ‘(industry) writing’, whatever you want. Just like doing searches on Google or Bing, you’ll naturally start discovering the search terms that work best for you.

  • When you do searches, particularly writing-related ones, you’ll discover the profiles that appear at the top of lists — look those profiles over and see what catches your eye for wording that you can adapt to your profile.

Connect with people. LinkedIn offers many ways to import various address books, and if you do that, invitations will be sent to the people in your contact list. It can be a good way to get started, but you won’t have any chance to personalize the e-mails sent out.

If you have specific questions about LinkedIn, feel free to ask in the comments. If you connect with me on LinkedIn, personalize the e-mail and let me know you read this blog.

LisaJJackson_2014Lisa J. Jackson is an independent writer and editor who enjoys working with manufacturing, software, and technology businesses of all sizes. She loves researching topics, interviewing experts, and helping companies tell their stories. You can connect with her onTwitterFacebook, and LinkedIn

16 Startup Metrics for Entrepreneurs to Master

Credits: 16 Startup Metrics for Entrepreneurs to Master.

 

A16Z has a great post up titled 16 Startup Metrics that outlines many of key metrics investors look for and entrepreneurs often get incorrect. I’m guilty of this: when I went into one of my first investor pitches 10 years ago, I talked about revenue when it really was bookings, and the VC politely corrected me.

Here are the 16 metrics to test your knowledge before reading 16 Startup Metrics:

  1. Bookings vs. revenue
  2. Recurring revenue vs. total revenue
  3. Gross profit
  4. Total contract value vs. annual contract value
  5. Lifetime value
  6. Gross merchandise value vs. revenue
  7. Unearned or deferred revenue … and billings
  8. Customer acquisition cost … blended vs. paid, organic vs. inorganic
  9. Active users
  10. Month-on-month growth
  11. Churn
  12. Burn rate
  13. Downloads
  14. Cumulative charts (vs. growth metrics)
  15. Chart tricks
  16. Order of operations

Every entrepreneur should read 16 Startup Metrics and understand the metrics applicable to their startup.

What else? What are some more startup metrics that are important?

Author: David Cummings  

Ways to start a conversation on social media

There are thousands and millions of users active on social media the question is how to engage with them. A brand can wait for the audience to start a conversation with it after publishing great content but there are other methods that can be deployed to proactively initiate customer conversations on social.  In Asia-Pacific there are 969 million active users in social.

Social Media Users In APAC

Initiate conversations by

Leave a comment: Find out where your audience participates on the social media communities and get started by leaving valuable comments.

Twitter Chat: Participate in organized chat that is relevant to the business. Or organize such chats on Twitter and get involved.

Answer Questions: Set up a social media listening program based on keywords, hashtags, geography, and more. Help customers by answering their questions that are relevant to your business or category.

Pose a question: Make it easy for people to comment on your content by posing questions that require varying levels of thoughtfulness.

Learn and optimize: If the tactics to spur sociability aren’t successful, try different methods, be persistent, and continue to optimize your efforts.

Listen to customer conversations

According to ‘2012 Insurance Voice of Customer Survey’ report, customers preferred online media to compare policies and services, gathering information and comparing price/rate more often than physical networks. Here is the list of activities insurance customers would prefer to do with social and physical networks.

Note: Question asked was “Based on your past experience when purchasing life (and non-life) insurance, which of the following two, a physical network (agents/brokers/ banks) or online network (internet/Mobile), is more effective at providing the following benefits”.Source: 2012 Insurance Voice of the Customer Survey, Capgemini, 2012

Before making a buying decision, buyers are interested to know what the existing consumers have to say about the brands and the products. This interaction between existing customers and potential buyers has added a new dimension to how marketers interact with their target audience. Social listening is a powerful research tool for generating actionable insights, because of its proximity and global audience coverage.

 

Tracking the number of likes on Facebook, followers on Twitter, views and subscribers on YouTube will not indicate what our customers like or dislikes about the product or will not signal their purchasing behavior. An active listening program is required to interpret customer voices, allowing brands to engage when conversations take a negative tone. Global brands like Dell, Cisco, Starbucks, and Coca-Cola leveraged social media to get closer to both employee and customer. Forrester Research estimates that companies will spend $1.6 billion on social by 2014 to track brand health, helping to ascertaining the tone of what is being said about the brand, how much interest is being generated about the company and products and how such conversation is influencing potential customers.

 

With 75% of U.S households participating in social media, it’s time for us to start listening with right set of listening tools partnered with human-enabled filtering and processing.

Free Social Media Listening Tools

Social media is all about listening to what audience has to say about you, analysing the data driving social media business intelligence using all these insights to know our customers better and improve our business stategy. There are a bunch of social media tools available out there, choose the right tool that suits your needs best. More important while selecting a tool one should know what you are trying to meassure and why.

That being said, let’s take a look at some of the best free monitoring tools:

1) Hootsuite: This is a great tool that allows you to save time when it comes to managing your social media accounts: Twitter, Facebook, LinkedIn, WordPress, Foursquare and Google+

2) TweetReach: TweetReach is the right tool for your business if you’re interested in monitoring how far your tweets travel, as TweetReach measures the actual impact and implications of social media discussions.

3) SocialMention: This tool allows you to listen for your brand, company, product, service, competitors or industry keyword mentions across social media channels. Data is pulled from dozens of social media services to give you the most real-time information.

4) Kred/Klout: Kred and Klout are two scoring services that review your social media activity, engagement, influence, authority, etc. and provide you with a score that tells you how you rank compared to others on social media.

5) Twitalyzer: Measure your impact, engagement, and influence on Twitter with this tool.

6) Peerindex: It helps brand identify the biggest key influencers in their social networks without the extensive manual labor that usually goes into the process.

This is not a comprehensive list of tools you can find many such free tools as well.

Share what tools you would use and for what purpose. Will be happy to hear from you all as well!

Best Times to Post on Social Media – By Fannit.com

Sending out messages during day seems to be the best option for brands to reach their audience.

JHR Group Blog

The folks at Fannit have released their latest infographic with the best times to post on social media.

Really good tips for those looking to increase their social media skills. Check out the full graphic below and click the link for tips from Fannit.com .

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Social Media Presence: The New York Times vs. The Washington Post

Janice Camacho

With most readers on the go, most news organizations are providing short updates via social media. Today, we examine The New York Times and Washington Post’s social media methods. Both websites are located on Twitter and Facebook—but interestingly enough, The New York Times makes this prominent on its website by putting it on the top, and The Washington Post puts this on the bottom of its page. Let’s see if their differences stop there. 

  1. The Washington Post’s (over two million followers) and The New York Times’ (almost 10 million followers) Twitters have a similar vibe: dark background, plus short and straight to the point tweets. However, The Washington Post seems a little friendlier because they are more likely to interact with their audience by retweeting. The New York Times mostly tweets about All The News That’s Fit To Print (their own), plus a few tweets here and there from followers.

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Role of Text Analytics In Social Media

In Social Media it is not only about reach, likes, retweets, and follows anymore. The spectrum of data is growing day by day and companies are facing difficulties in gaining the true value from social data. Though the current listening methodologies and strategies help organizations to understand customer pulse, there is a lot of valuable information left unnoticed by of listening experts. This happens because of of the amount of noise and real data harnessed around a brand or product. With the help of text analytics social media data can be sliced and diced to understand different aspect of consumer feedback. 

Image

Gaining Structured Insight to Unstructured data

According to Wikipedia, The term text analytics describes “a set of linguisticstatistical, and machine learning techniques that model and structure the information content of textual sources for business intelligenceexploratory data analysisresearch, or investigation”. 

 Text analytics helps you quickly analyze thousands of social data to identify the customer issues and concerns that demand immediate attention. Text analytics has multiple applications in analyzing text but in this article we will be looking at the following aspects

  • Theme identification: Conversations can be auto-categorized and organized into relevant categories based on automatically detected themes and content.
  • Sentiment Analysis: Determine customer sentiment, on product or brand level.

Gaining Structured Insight to Unstructured data

Theme Identification: Text analytic techniques are useful for sorting through and categorizing large volumes of content. In Text analytics Words are treated similar to other forms of Data. In a text data set, Words are counted, grouped and summarized with statistics. As said before text analytic techniques are quite good at text categorization. 

Classification algorithm looks at features, such as the frequency of words in a document relative to the frequency of terms in all documents.  These techniques are also used to group similar documents even without predefined categories. Using this we can also identify emerging topics around a brand or product. 

Sentiment analysis: Text analytics also have some value in extracting the users emotions or opinion or attitude and classify accordingly but there are some limitations in this area. Sentiment analysis is one of the common text analysis task used by social media researchers in recent times. In common sentiment analysis is categorized as positive, negative or neutral.  Simple text analytic techniques, such as counting positive and negative words, can give reasonable results in many cases. Sentiment is classified based on the list positive words or negative words updated into the system. In such cases this techniques will not differentiate between sarcasm and genuine comments. 

Tools For Text Analytics

Text mining computer programs are available from many commercial and open source companies and sources.

Commercial Tools Open Source Tools
AeroText  Carrot2 
Angoss  GATE 
Attensity  OpenNLP
Autonomy  Natural Language Toolkit (NLTK) 
Basis Technology  RapidMiner
Clarabridge  UIMA
Endeca Technologies  Language R
Fair Isaac  The KNIME
IBM LanguageWare KH Coder
IBM SPSS Modeler Premium The PLOS
Inxight  Weka
LanguageWare   
Lexalytics  
Mathematica   
NetOwl   
SAS   
Smartlogic   
StatSoft   
Sysomos   
WordStat  
Xpresso   
Thomson Data Analyzer   

In the next article i will try to explain this technique using WEKA Data Mining tool. I will try to explain as comprehensive as possible. Please share your thoughts on this topic, i would love to learn it from you. !Thanks for reading !